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Hotel Costa Verde

Posted: Tuesday, September 25, 2012
Hotel Costa Verde
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  • Hotel Costa Verde
  • Hotel Costa Verde
  • Hotel Costa Verde
  • Hotel Costa Verde
  • Hotel Costa Verde
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The 727 Fuselage Home is Hotel Costa Verde's phoenix. A refurbished 1965 Boeing 727 airframe--formerly used to jet fliers of South Africa Air and Colombia's Avianca Airlines--now serves as a unique tropical retreat bursting forth from underneath the jungle canopy in Costa Rica's Manuel Antonio National Park.

Mounted atop a 50-foot pedestal, the Fuselage Home invites guests to climb up its incorporated river rock and whimsical spiral staircase, pausing outside for a moment to enjoy scenic ocean and jungle views from its wood deck, which was built over the plane's former right wing. Inside, Costa Rican teak paneling lines familiar concave walls and ceilings from cockpit to tail, and hand-carved teak furniture from Java, Indonesia caps off the meticulously detailed décor. Bedtime in the 727 means sleepy travelers retire to one of two air-conditioned bedrooms, each with either one or two queen-sized beds, and ensuite bathrooms.

Hotel Costa Verde also welcomes guests into a host of other bungalows and rooms on its expansive grounds. Shared amenities, in addition to the hotel's location just 300 yards from the beach, include three cliff-side swimming pools, plus a second dazzling airplane attraction. El Avion is a Fairchild C-123 that has been converted to the hotel's nifty bar and restaurant. For those seeking a thriftier mile-high encounter than the 727 Fuselage Home, El Avion affords a similarly exclusive experience, particularly sunset drinks at the recycled glass bottle bar.

The 727 Fuselage Home Quandary

While in the fabled days of yore air travel was considered a luxury worthy of sleepless anticipation and Sunday's finest attire, today the thought of spending multiple hours in an airplane typically incurs a feeling of dread akin to telling someone, "It's not you, it's me." Cramped seats, no leg room, constantly dwindling amenities, bathrooms so unbelievably small that new inaugurations into the mile-high club are now virtually impossible--big birds of the sky haven't just lost much of their romanticism, they've become downright unpalatable. But is the residual taste of the excruciating hassle today's flights entail enough to turn sour the idea of sleeping in a souped up 727? Do the negative associations transfer to Hotel Costa Verde's winged jewel? You tell us.

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